How and where did Jim Morrison die

The aggressive dreamer

Jim Morrison in action in his prime.

The photo was taken from the book "Jim Morrison - The King of the Lizard" published by Verlag Schirmer / Mosel

Even 25 years after his death, the crowd of his admirers does not decrease. Jim Morrison is one of the cult figures in rock music. And it's not just the young people who remained loyal to him, his songs also live in the consciousness of the younger generation. Even today, crowds make a pilgrimage to his grave in Paris at the Pere-Lachaise cemetery: On July 3, 1971, 25 years ago, Jim Morrison was found dead in Paris. He was only allowed to live for 27 years.

Living in Los Angeles in the mid-1960s meant being constantly on drugs for many teenagers. She was drawn to the city from all over the USA. Jim Morrison, 21 years old, son of a brigadier general in the US Navy, handsome but rather shy, exceptionally intelligent, also arrived there in 1964. He wanted to study film at university. After twelve months - his film had failed at the end of the semester - he dropped out. Up until then he had picked up a huge number of books, now he tried alcohol and drugs. He was obsessed with subversive thoughts. Morrison: “I like the idea of ​​overthrowing, of shaking off

an established order. I'm interested in everything that concerns revolt, disorder, chaos - especially activities that don't seem to make any sense. That seems to me to be the only way to freedom. "

In September 1965, the musically gifted man and three companions - they called themselves "The Doors" - recorded the first songs. They played jazzy white blues rock and became a house band in various clubs. Morrison, often drunk and high on stage, was the main attraction of the band with his unique voice. He also provided most of the texts in which he mixed philosophy, psychology, mythology, literary knowledge and hippie rhetoric. His short and concise songs, with the dominant motifs of sex and death, were often difficult to decipher, and that did not stand in the way of their distribution.

The extraordinary first LP "The Doors" set standards, the single "Light My Fire" became number 1 in the USA. When the second LP "Strange Days" was released at the end of 1967, many critics put the Doors in line with the Beatles. Right at the beginning of their career, the "Doors" set artistic standards that they later "despaired" by themselves.

Morrison obviously came along

his fame and the problems of the time. He became more and more drunk, and negative character traits increasingly came to the fore. He was involved in fights more and more often. Relationships were pushed to the limit, only to see how they broke up.

Danny Fields of the Elektra record company: "Morrison didn't give a damn about money, possessions or property - he was one of the few people back then who were genuinely anti-bourgeois." Unlike his fans, Jim Morrison often doubted himself. He was the star hype not grown. So he took out his anger on himself, on the rest of the band or on the audience. When performing, for example, he tried to scare the fans, insulted them, spat on them, shocked them with obscene sex signs. Morrison's alleged exhibitionism sparked controversy in the United States, with 30,000 outraged citizens demonstrating in Florida against what they believed to be the advancing moral decline.

Alcohol and drugs increasingly drew the singer, the handsome man became an overweight drunkard. But he kept his dream of gaining recognition as a poet, although his lyrics, stripped of their music, lost their meaning.

In 1971 Morrison went to Paris. His thoughts revolved around Rimbaud, Baudelaire, Hemingway, Fitzgerald and the Paris of the 1920s. He wrote poems, rattled off sights, but his drinking tours continued. On July 3, 1971, his girlfriend Pamela found him dead in the bathtub in the morning. Heart failure was officially cited as the cause of death, but it is now believed that Morrison was associated with major

Likelihood of dying from excessive alcohol consumption and a heroin overdose

The question of why the Doors are still so popular is asked again and again. This is certainly not due to general nostalgia. In he

First and foremost, it is due to the quality of their songs, the rationally difficult to describe correspondence between music and poetry. The hopes of the youth hidden therein, which are still dreamed up today, do not fail to have an effect.

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